Yamarita + Asun = Y’asun

Yamarita + Asun = Y’asun

I was talking to a friend yesterday about our pre-teen/high school past and it’s hilarious the number of stupid things we did and kind of trouble we got ourselves into. For example, when I was about 11 or 12, I loved to read – not sure why I said “loved” because I still do – so I would take novels everywhere. Now, there was a collection of Mills and Boon novels in the house (don’t ask who owned that collection *side eye*). And if you know Mills and Boon novels, you know that they are fairly explicit *sniggers at “fairly”* especially for a pre-teen. But did that stop me from reading the novels? Nope. I was a curious kid. At least that’s my excuse.

Sample of what a Mills & Boon novel looks like

Sample of what a Mills & Boon novel looks like

I also wasn’t too sharp at times. One Sunday before church, I got ahead of myself and put one of the novels in my bag intending to read it in church. My older sister saw it and asked “are you taking that to church?”. Translation: “1. You’re way too young to read that. 2. If mummy finds out, you’re dead. 3. And you’re taking it to church? Do you fear God? 4. But that’s none of my business anyway.”

Ignoring her, I took it to church because I had a solid plan: I would sit somewhere at the back of class and put it in between my bible and read it secretly. Brilliant right? No? Well it worked and I didn’t get caught in church. But as we got home and I got out of the car, I didn’t realize the book had fallen out of my bag and on the seat. My mom was clearing out the back seat and saw the novel.

“Who is reading this book?,” she asked.

God. Why?

Silence fell and my siblings turned to look at me. The fear that gripped my heart. Ah. The dread for what was about to happen.

What would I say? What lie could I tell? That it wasn’t me? No, that won’t work because who else could it have been? Maybe I could say it was the devil. No, that would just open a new can of worms. Or i could just tell the truth… lol no no, forget the truth. So I kept quiet. Pleaded the Fifth. But I guess my brain touched or something because I forgot that in a Lagos house there’s no Fifth Amendment.

I don’t really remember the events that transpired after. I was probably so traumatized that my brain had to wipe every memory that followed. *shivers*

And this story has absolutely nothing to do with my Asun & Yamarita recipe. My bad.

Ingredients

Yamarita (Deep-Fried Battered Yam)
  1. Yam
  2. Water for boiling
  3. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  4. 1 large egg
  5. 1/2 knorr cube
  6. 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  7. 1/2 teaspoon chilli powder
  8. Oil for deep-frying
Asun (Smoked & Peppered Goat Meat)
  1. Goat meat
  2. 1 knorr cube
  3. 1 medium-sized onion – sliced
  4. 2 scotch bonnet peppers – chopped
  5. 2 tablespoons oil

Directions

Slice the yam and cut into preferred shape. Place in water and salt and boil till it is tender, but not too soft (to prevent it breaking up while frying).
Once boiled, take off heat and shock with cold water to stop cooking process and set aside


Cut goat meat into small bite-sized pieces. Season with knorr cube and place in pot with some diced onions and steam till fully cooked. (Do not add any water. No, it won’t burn unless you leave it on the stove for hours… which is kind of normal)


Once cooked, place on a baking tray and bake in the oven till the meat is dry (approximately 15-20 minutes at 350F)


In that time, set up dipping station for yamarita with the yam, eggs and flour. Season flour with knorr cube and eggs with chilli (or vice versa.)


Dip yam one by one into the flour and roll in eggs. Heat oil in a large pan and fry the yamarita till golden brown and place on a paper towel to absorb excess oil
Put a medium saute pan on high heat. Once very hot, take off heat and add oil, goat meat, onions and peppers. The meat should be smoking (which is good but turn on your vent/open the windows).


Place back on heat and fry till onions are half tender – half crunchy (approximately 3 minutes). Remove from heat


Serve asun over yamarita with a cold glass of chapman

Yamarita and Asun
Write a review
Print
Yamarita (Deep-Fried Battered Yam)
  1. Yam
  2. Water for boiling
  3. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  4. 1 large egg
  5. 1/2 knorr cube
  6. 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  7. 1/2 teaspoon chilli powder
  8. Oil for deep-frying
Asun (Smoked & Peppered Goat Meat)
  1. Goat meat
  2. 1 knorr cube
  3. 1 medium-sized onion - sliced
  4. 2 scotch bonnet peppers - chopped
  5. 2 tablespoons oil
Instructions
  1. Slice the yam and cut into preferred shape. Place in water and salt and boil till it is tender, but not too soft (to prevent it breaking up while frying).
  2. Once boiled, take off heat and shock with cold water to stop cooking process and set aside
  3. Cut goat meat into small bite-sized pieces. Season with knorr cube and place in pot with some diced onions and steam till fully cooked. (Do not add any water. No, it won't burn unless you leave it on the stove for hours... which is kind of normal)
  4. Once cooked, place on a baking tray and bake in the oven till the meat is dry (approximately 15-20 minutes at 350F)
  5. In that time, set up dipping station for yamarita with the yam, eggs and flour. Season flour with knorr cube and eggs with chilli (or vice versa.)
  6. Dip yam one by one into the flour and roll in eggs. Heat oil in a large pan and fry the yamarita till golden brown and place on a paper towel to absorb excess oil
  7. Put a medium saute pan on high heat. Once very hot, take off heat and add oil, goat meat, onions and peppers. The meat should be smoking (which is good but turn on your vent/open the windows).
  8. Place back on heat and fry till onions are half tender - half crunchy (approximately 3 minutes). Remove from heat
  9. Serve asun over yamarita with a cold glass of chapman
Tatashey http://www.tatashey.com/
Share:

1 Comment

  1. Layo
    December 31, 2014 / 2:57 AM

    First time visiting your food blog and i love you already. God bless you for your creativity. :* will be trying this yamarita today today

Leave a Reply to Layo Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *